Filed under houseplants

Grow Your Favorite Houseplant

Even with spring beginning on the calendar, it’s early to move gardening beyond last season’s sanitation outdoors. While the weather settles, a creative outlet with a favorite indoor plant is to propagate cuttings. If it works, you’ll have more plants, like this begonia, to keep or share with others. If you’ve ever included Coleus leaves … Continue reading

Houseplants to Brighten a Winter Day

In morning winter silence on a walk by the Missouri River, water that slowed before the Gavins Point Dam lies solid. The mile and a half or so across this lake is a panorama of frozen motion. Occasional booming echoes from some fissure, some crack in eight-inch or so layer as water from upstream presses … Continue reading

Gardener’s Time Off

What does a gardener do with unstructured time in winter? Some of the garden-related topics for enjoyment with a practical twist that this gardener might choose to include checking plants in the nursery, reading missed articles from favorite gardening magazines, and previewing seed catalogs for new ideas and introductions. Here is the nursery under the … Continue reading

Recharge Garden Interest

At Plant Exchange blog, we depend on a few indoor plants to recharge our interest for next season’s gardening. Amaryllis is an easy-care plant with its battery to supply kick-start energy for the plant to grow and bloom.  Amaryllis bulb in its native Africa comes to life with spring rains, has 2-5 sparkling blooms for … Continue reading

Three Easy-Care Houseplants

Adequate quality light in winter is necessary for healthy houseplants. In this USDA 4-5a growing zone on the Northern Plains, lack of satisfactory light quality indoors can be a problem. Choosing plants with a tolerance to lower light increases the chance they can adapt to the indirect winter sunlight they receive.  These houseplants can be … Continue reading

Versatile Boston Fern

Boston or Sword Fern is a familiar light shade porch plant in summer. It grows well in a container, and its 3-foot arching fronds move in the breeze. While some treat it as an annual to buy and discard each year, it adapts well to bring it indoors as an easy-care house plant.  A friend … Continue reading

How Does a Winter-Flowering Plant Make Seed?

Camellias are introduced plants from Japan and nearby Asian countries that have adapted well in the Southeast United States for more than a hundred years. In the south, camellias bloom in the fall or winter or early spring, sometimes before bulb plants. In nature, not many plants bloom at this time. Camellias are shrubs with … Continue reading

Decorate for the Holidays with your Plants

We can create our home version of “Holiday Beautiful” with the plants around us from the growing season.  Sometimes ornamental grasses have a second life. It continues to move in the wind as a dried plant in winter. Lights add a festive look at night. Eastern red cedar boughs, some with green berries, stay fresh … Continue reading

Transition to Fall

Today, let’s look at plants in transition on the Northern Plains, here at Plant Exchange blog. Trees are beginning to turn fall colors. Sunflowers are still in bloom at the edge of fields, in flowerbeds, and containers. Pollinators enjoy Agastache and other flowers in bloom. We begin to bring in plants that overwinter indoors about … Continue reading

Houseplants Add Pep

Too early to lounge outdoors here. It’s about eight weeks before the last frost when starter plants and houseplants needing rejuvenation are taken outdoors. What can we do with houseplants to add pep to our indoor surroundings now? Rearrange houseplants. Consider moving plants to different rooms where light is better as the angle of the … Continue reading