Tagged with gardening

Peonies’ “Repeated Refrains of Nature”

We’re watching our perennials begin to grow this slow-to-warm spring. Peonies (Hardiness Zone 3-8) are among the earliest herbaceous perennials to emerge from winter. We saw their red stems about the time daffodils bloomed.   Green leaves unfurl later as the warming sun shines several days in a row and rains fall. Finally, the plant … Continue reading

Plant Markers of Spring–May 15th

Lilacs have leafed out and are reaching full bloom as spring conditions improve, quite a remarkable plant sustainability trait. Lilacs line the Lewis & Clark Recreation Area along the Missouri River near home in a USDA 4-5a hardiness zone. Welcome to Plant Exchange Blog in South Dakota. Fall planted spring bulbs such as daffodils and … Continue reading

Black-eyed Susans and other Rudbeckias

Black-eyed Susans grow in lots of yards in this USDA zone 4-5a region. The perennial, full-sun, yellow flower mounds appear by summer and bloom into fall. Their bold color and easy maintenance make them attractive for borders.  Black-eyed Susans and other Rudbeckias are featured this week as attractive, hardy North American native plants with large … Continue reading

Regional Plant-Related Event

South Dakota State University Extension Hosts “Garden Hour Webinar” online this season. For the free, hour long gardening show for our region, go to www.extension.sdstate.edu website. Choose the “Events” tab and see more information and the registration for Garden Hour Webinar. Featured to discuss the current season in the garden will be horticulturist Dr. Rhoda Burrows, tree … Continue reading

Trees for the Prairie

Greenhouses burst with alluring annuals for our gardens. If these flowers were wearable, we might consider them jewelry, and the trees that anchor our yards as fundamental as the black dress.  Trees and shrubs add a vertical shape to the area above the annuals and perennials in a yard. Trees can be the welcoming presence … Continue reading

Last Bittersweet Days of Winter

The ending of winter can be a bittersweet transition to spring. Maybe these days are a chance for uninterrupted reading opportunities, time to think about new season plants or time to prepare. For now, let’s think about bluebells, other blue flowers, a podcast, and bittersweet vine. Virginia bluebells grow on the Northern Plains! The striking blue … Continue reading

Dream a Garden Space

February can be the creative start to your personalized garden space. The cozy indoors with lots of photos of your landscape or a stack of gardening magazines with pictures that show aspects of spaces you are attracted to is a place to begin. Collect images that show your space as it is and the look … Continue reading

Garden Winners

Who doesn’t want flower or vegetable plants that grow well with abundant foliage and flowers? When they are grown in your region of the country and compared to similar plants and still have stand-out qualities, that’s a winner. All-America Selections is a national non-profit plant trialing organization that acquaints the public with new cultivars. Impartial gardening … Continue reading

Gardener’s Time Off

What does a gardener do with unstructured time in winter? Some of the garden-related topics for enjoyment with a practical twist that this gardener might choose to include checking plants in the nursery, reading missed articles from favorite gardening magazines, and previewing seed catalogs for new ideas and introductions. Here is the nursery under the … Continue reading

Dibbles and Bits

We’re looking at winter interest, rewilding, and season wind-down for today’s Plant Exchange.   ***Nearly mid-December, the first “shoveling” flips the landscape into contrasts we haven’t seen for a year. Now the red hues of Little Bluestem and Miscanthus appear against white snow cover. Snowcaps adorn the spent golden yarrow from summer. No wonder this is … Continue reading