Tagged with gardening

Garden Bloggers Bloom Day-September 15th

Plant Exchange Blog is in South Dakota on the Northern Plains, USDA Zone 4-5a. While the region continues with drought and high summer temperatures, today is mild with rain. We aimed to plant more native flowers or their cultivars this growing season for a more sustainable and low-input garden. Transplants from seed are fun to … Continue reading

More Happy Days of Summer with Sunflowers

Some of the best parts of summer are when there are few days left. Lots of sunflowers, symbols of happy days, grow here.  In our region of the United States, archeologists have found evidence of corn, bean, squash, sunflower and amaranth cultivation about 1000 A.D. Sunflowers can be found planted in a field in this … Continue reading

Gardening in Our Changeable Weather

Gardening with some flowers and produce return and an eye on sustainable practices keeps most of us ready to try next season, even in challenging weather conditions. Rudbeckia was last year’s blooming standout perennial. Drought bested some returning rudbeckia, and deer widened their taste palate for them this season, but some survived to bloom again. … Continue reading

Garden Bloggers Bloom Day–August 15th

Welcome to Plant Exchange Blog on the Northern Plains (USDA Zone 4-5a). After a summer of drought, today we received 3.9 inches of rain that fell steadily in the morning and afternoon, and we are grateful. The Joe Pye Weed that can tolerate much more moisture than it’s received is in full bloom, along with Echinacea. In … Continue reading

Outdoor Container Garden Nursery

Garden flowers or vegetables you plant together in a container take a little time to look their best before they are displayed. These succulents are an example. Container flowers and vegetables mature at different times, and it’s handy to have a dedicated space, a nursery, with adequate sunlight and water nearby to care for them … Continue reading

Garden Bloggers Bloom Day-July 15th

Welcome to Plant Exchange Blog. We’re along the Missouri River on the southern edge of South Dakota on the Northern Plains, USDA Zone 4 and 5. We have high temperatures in the 90’s, like some other areas. This season, a goal is to add more colorful perennials to flowerbeds. I enjoy trying to grow some … Continue reading

Plant Adaptations are Amazing

A friend mentioned that each of his garden corn plants has three stalks, likely because of temperature and rain fluctuations this season. Most plants are fixed in their environments but show exceptional capabilities of adaptation and procreation. Three examples come to mind. Finding the environment and methods for wildflowers to grow in native grass is … Continue reading

What You Looking At?

What someone sees, who likes plants, and what Ms. Wild Turkey sees likely differ. After spring rains, the yellow yarrow and purple catmint begin to bloom. The lime barberry shrub accents the yellow. Most of the trees and shrubs in this region now have leaves, except for the fenced Japanese maple, which is slow to … Continue reading

Peonies’ “Repeated Refrains of Nature”

We’re watching our perennials begin to grow this slow-to-warm spring. Peonies (Hardiness Zone 3-8) are among the earliest herbaceous perennials to emerge from winter. We saw their red stems about the time daffodils bloomed.   Green leaves unfurl later as the warming sun shines several days in a row and rains fall. Finally, the plant … Continue reading