Gardening in the Moment

In the rush of spring planting, there’s so much available to see now that quickly changes. Maybe the elusive quality of peony flowers makes them even more beautiful as you admire them now and the wind plucks their petals.

Moisture is a premium this spring at Plant Exchange and throughout South Dakota this spring. Thankfully, we had a light rain recently. The buffalo grass lawn is a warm-season grass just turning green. Buffalo grass is a short native grass that can resist drought.  By chance, working the yard, we noticed the grass. Plants collect water droplets that may run down their blades to their roots.  

Poppies are transitory bloomers with distinctively bold flowers. Some years I don’t see them bloom.

Salad lettuce is ready for its second cutting. Just enough sunshine and cool temperatures are the right conditions for tender leaf lettuce. We’ll plant more heat-resistant varieties for summer salads.

Many hope to get their vegetable and flower gardens seeded and transplants in soon. In late April, the garden with last season’s leaves as mulch lay ready for plants when soil temperatures warmed. Watching farmers’ crops for signs of first emerging plants is usually a signal to plant.

Beans are growing. When taking the photo today, these insect holes in a few leaves remind me to check the plants often. Sometimes insect feeding will not hamper bean production unless more of the leaves are eaten. South Dakota Extension at South Dakota State University, website: www.extension.sdstate.edu is a resource for troubleshooting garden diseases and pests.

Peony buds came indoors for us to enjoy their short bloom. Lingering thoughts of these early spring moments may carry us through weeding time! 

If you want to see more about vegetables, just choose your topic on the right side of the screen and see many posts that feature gardeners and their skills.

Thanks for visiting Plant Exchange blog today. Thanks for your “Likes” of favorite topics, and thanks to “Followers” who show up each week. Happy gardening!

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